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Long-Term Disability Benefits Archives

The long-term effects of a stroke aren't just physical, p. 3

May is American Stroke Month, and we are taking this opportunity to offer some basic information about one of the most common reasons for long-term disability claims. So far, we have reviewed the types of stroke and talked a little about the physical and cognitive damage a stroke can inflict. During recovery, patients can also experience emotional ups and downs, because the stroke has damaged the part of the brain that controls emotions and, at times, behavior.

The long-term effects of a stroke aren't just physical, p. 2

The actress Patricia Neal is one of the most famous stroke survivors. Having won an Academy Award and a Tony Award, Neal was at the height of her career when she inexplicably suffered a series of strokes. The physical and emotional toll of her illness and recovery prevented her from performing, from making a living for years after.

The long-term effects of a stroke aren't just physical

Stroke is not just a geriatric issue. According to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, about 28 percent of the people in this state who have a stroke are under 65. While strokes are often fatal, a good number of people survive a stroke -- a good number of working people, in fact, because stroke is one of the most common causes of long-term disability.

Long-term disability application leads to privacy case, concl.

We are still discussing a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision about the Privacy Act and its waiver of sovereign immunity. The plaintiff sued a handful of federal agencies when his HIV status was made public; the agencies had shared information about him, including his application for Social Security disability benefits. In the majority opinion, the court focused on the act allowing individuals to file civil actions if they suffered "actual damages" because of an agency's violation.

Long-term disability application leads to privacy case, p. 3

The decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in a Privacy Act case has caused a stir among consumer advocates and in legal circles. The plaintiff accused the Federal Aviation Administration, the Social Security Administration and the United States Department of Transportation of violating the Privacy Act when the agencies shared information about his Social Security long-term disability benefits. As we said in our last post, the majority decision turned on the Privacy Act's use of the term "actual damages."

Long-term disability application leads to privacy case, cont.

We are picking up our discussion from earlier this month of a U.S. Supreme Court case that provoked some strong feelings for commentators. As we explained in our April 5 post, the case was brought by a man whose HIV status became public knowledge at the hands of the federal government.

Long-term disability benefits at risk in Nortel bankruptcy

In the business world, there is an underlying tension between employees and investors. While neither will survive, much less thrive, without the other, budget considerations often come down to what's good for the investor or what's good for the employee. Right now, telecommunications company Nortel Networks Corp. is between that rock and hard place, and its long-term disability benefits and retiree health care plans are both at risk.

Long-term disability application leads to Supreme Court privacy case

The U.S. Supreme Court has handed down a decision that reinforces the doctrine of sovereign immunity, even when questions of private health data are concerned. The case specifically addresses the provisions of the federal Privacy Act, but it started with a terrible diagnosis and a claim for long-term disability benefits.

Family Care bill expected to sail through Wisconsin House

It is hard enough to deal with having a loved one, a husband or wife or parent, hurt on the job. If the injury results in a permanent disability, one of the toughest decisions you will have to make is how to ensure that your family member receives the best long-term care possible. Sadly, the question of quality is often overshadowed by the questions of cost -- as helpful as disability benefits are, they seldom make up for all of the lost income.

Aging workforce challenges workplace norms

Thanks in part to the recession, an increasing number of older workers in the United States are staying in the workforce. This, however, does not make them immune from the physical deterioration that comes with aging. Reduced physical condition and other adverse effects of aging could make these individuals more susceptible to workplace hazards. In such cases where older workers are injured on the job, long-term disability benefits are a must in order for them to survive.

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