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Americans with Disabilities Act Archives

HIV-positive man claims disability discrimination

Since HIV first came to be well-known among Americans, there have been many advancements made. These advancements aren't limited solely to treatment of the disease, but also to the general attitude toward people who have contracted the virus. The change of attitude has come largely as a result of public education campaigns about how the disease is actually spread. A recent focus of these movements has been to allow more HIV-positive people to find employment by preventing disability discrimination. As a result, those who are positive for the virus in Wisconsin are protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Medical center sued for disability discrimination

A medical center is in hot water after being sued in district court over the firing of a mentally disabled man back in 2008, according to local sources. Wisconsin residents are well aware that people with mental disabilities are perfectly capable of performing as outstanding employees, which makes this disability discrimination case all the more upsetting. Thankfully, the issue has been brought to the attention of a district court and legal recourse is being undertaken on behalf of the wronged employee.

Wisconsin woman takes action for disability discrimination

It is the constitutional right of every American to be treated fairly and without discrimination. Discrimination is the lawful and intentional unfair treatment of a person based on any of a set of federally protected characteristics. Disability discrimination occurs when a person with a disability is treated unfairly, or when adequate accommodations are not made for people with disabilities. Recently, the 2012 Ms. Wheelchair Wisconsin has taken action against disability discrimination throughout the city of Whitewater.

County worker receives settlement for disability discrimination

The Americans with Disabilities Act is designed to protect disabled workers in Wisconsin and across the nation. When an employer violates that act by failing to provide reasonable accommodation or wrongfully terminating a disabled worker, it may be grounds for a disability discrimination suit. A former county worker in another state sued for just that reason, and the county government recently agreed to a settlement in his case.

Americans with Disabilities Act requires work accommodations

It's a rough road for employees with disabilities, and sometimes it's even tougher if the employer merely 'perceives' that there's a disability. Wisconsin and all other states are bound by the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This case is about a deputy Sheriff in another state who had a stroke. He came back to work several months later on a part-time basis and then moved to full-time.

New diagnostic guidelines may lead to ADA requests

As we often discuss in this blog, employers here in Wisconsin are required to make certain accommodations for employees with disabilities. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers must provide changes to a workplace or role--reasonable accommodations--in order to allow workers with disabilities to perform their jobs. Examples of such accommodations include modifying equipment, such as adding computer screen magnifiers or adjusting desk height, and adjusting schedules, among other things.

EEOC files genetic information discrimination lawsuit

We write quite a bit about the Americans with Disabilities Act in this Milwaukee Employment Law Blog. Many employers and employees in Wisconsin are aware that this federal law bars employers from discriminating against workers or job applicants on the basis of a real or perceived disability. Another law that is closely tied to the ADA is the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. This act was just passed into law in 2009, and many employers do not understand what this requires of them.

Landmark verdict sends message about disability discrimination

Wisconsin residents may have heard that a landmark Americans with Disabilities Act case came to a close this week. The case involved a Texas turkey processor that ran a labor camp for mentally disabled men in Iowa for decades until the Des Moines Register brought the camp to the attention of state officials in 2009.

Wal-Mart sued after firing victim of workplace sexual harassment

Employment claims filed under the Americans with Disabilities Act here in Wisconsin often involve accusations of discrimination in hiring, advancement or other work-related activities. Discrimination against people with disabilities in the workplace is often subtle--such as the failure of an employer to provide a worker with accommodations that would aid in his or her abilities to do a job, for example. A lawsuit that was recently filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission against a division of Wal-Mart involves allegations of very egregious ADA violations.

Only 18 percent of Americans with disabilities are employed

Although it has been illegal for employers to discriminate against workers and applicants with disabilities for more than 20 years in Wisconsin and throughout the U.S., a recent news report suggests that this type of discrimination is still very common. Only 18 percent of Americans with disabilities of working age are currently employed, and this is actually down 2 percent from 2009. According to the Associated Press, these numbers have been relatively stable since the Americans with Disabilities Act outlawed discrimination in employment in 1990.

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