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Social Security Disability Archives

Replacing the DOT

Social Security currently relies on the Dictionary of Occupational Titles for its analysis of potential jobs in the national market related to a claimant's ability to perform a job. This reference however is woefully outdated and the Administration has concluded that it needs to rely on a more current resource.

Substantial Gainful Employment

In order to be disabled, a claimant must be precluded by their medical condition from engaging in substantial gainful activity (SGA). In more common terms, SGA means substantial gainful employment, or the ability to be a reliable, productive employee. The consideration is whether the claimant can be relied upon to show up to work on time on a regular and continuous basis and perform the essential functions of the job (with or without accommodations) over a sustained period of time.

The effect of past work

Social Security applications require information regarding work performed by the claimant in the past fifteen years. Most claimants are not working at the time, but this information is a critical part of the disability analysis.

Two types of disability programs through the Social Security Administration

There are two different types of disability programs through the Social Security Administration: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Not all individuals are eligible for one or even both of these programs, but they both offer benefits for disabled persons who are unable to perform any type of work activity.

Am I Covered?

Generally speaking, if you are injured while at work, the injury is compensable and covered by the employers workers compensation insurance. This insurance covers medical bills, prescription costs and payment for time off of work. There are however, instances when a person is not covered, so what makes a compensable injury?

No matter what your disability, the most important element of an application for SSDI/SSI is medical records and reports

No matter what your disability, the most important element of an application for SSDI/SSI is medical records and reports. The doctors who treat your condition regularly are the best source of information regarding your particular condition, symptoms, side effects, medications, treatment options and progress.

Are my Social Security Benefits taxable?

It has been said that there are only 3 guarantees in life and one of those is that you will have to pay taxes. Naturally then, disabled persons constantly ask us if Social Security disability benefits are taxable. The good news is that only some people will have to pay taxes on their benefits.

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