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Family and Medical Leave Act Archives

Court says Family and Medical Leave Act is not automatic

The phone rings, and it is a family member expressing the need for one to come home to help take care of an ailing parent. Or perhaps, the individual is ill and requires time away from work. Regardless of what type of situation a Wisconsin employee may find himself in, a court has recently stated that benefits under the Family and Medical Leave Act are not automatic. They must be formally requested.

Unpaid leave is a hardship many cannot afford

Although the Family and Medical Leave Act is a federal law that provides employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year, there are several people who do not meet the strict eligibility standards. In order to be eligible for FMLA leave in Wisconsin, an employee must work for a covered employer for a total of twelve months, although not necessarily consecutively, and for at least 1,250 hours within the previous 12 months. Also, the employee must work at a location where the company employs 50 or more employees within 75 miles of his or her worksite. FMLA does not necessarily apply to everyone and those who are protected are often faced with the prospect of using unpaid leave for the duration of the time away from the job.

What's in store for the Family and Medical Leave Act?

2013 signified the twenty-year anniversary of the Family and Medical Leave Act in the United States. The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) of 1993 mandates that covered employers offer as many as 12 weeks of unpaid leave without jeopardizing the job status of eligible employees for various family and individual medical situations. These medical situations include pregnancy and care for a newborn, placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care, care for an immediate family member with a serious health condition and the employee's own serious health condition. Passing the law in 1993 was a victory for many who wanted to protect the welfare of American families. Wisconsin families and individuals continue the effort to provide job security in a time of need; 2014 may mark a new milestone for the law if Congress takes action.

Family and Medical Leave Act: provision changes may be coming

Big changes may be afoot for the structure of FMLA and for the future of Wisconsin workers. Under the current provisions of the Family and Medical Leave Act, eligible employees of covered employers are given unpaid leave for up to 12 weeks in a 12-month period if they become critically ill or need to care for a family member or child. The changes are being pursued by Senator Kristen Gillibrand of New York, who believes that the current legislation -- in place since 1993 -- places unfair impositions on families and loved ones, forcing them to have to choose between family and career.

Unpaid leave: efforts to change are met with varying results

The conversation about employees having access to paid sick leave has been ongoing and has left many still searching for answers. Workers should be eligible to be protected under the Family and Medical Leave Act for serious illness or family emergency care if the terms of employment meet specific requirements. However, unpaid leave continues to be a reality for many in the workplace in Wisconsin and in other states.

Family and Medical Leave Act violation and racial discrimination

American citizens can protect their rights in the event that they are fired based on discrimination in its various forms. Wisconsin state and federal laws exist to protect individuals and prohibit any adverse employment action including discharge, lack of promotion and unequal pay based on discrimination because of the employee's race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, handicap or disability. Two prison guards were recently fired and have taken action to file discrimination charges for violation of Family and Medical Leave Act and racial discrimination.

Time Warner guilty of Family and Medical Leave Act violation?

A major corporation has been accused of gender discrimination under basic FMLA laws. In Wisconsin and elsewhere, the Family and Medical Leave Act applies to all public agencies, all public and private elementary and secondary schools, and companies with 50 or more employees. Recently, a CNN journalist has accused Time Warner of committing FMLA-related gender discrimination.

Wisconsin employees and the Family and Medical Leave Act

Many employers violate the Family Medical Leave Act. No employee should fear for their job after going on extended leave. The Wisconsin Family and Medical Leave Act mandates that covered employers offer as many as eight weeks of unpaid leave without jeopardizing the job status of eligible employees for various family and individual medical situations. Recently, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) has planned to propose new legislation that will amend the FMLA to ensure that employees ' family and medical leave rights are better preserved.

Activists worry Wisconsin Family and Medical Leave Act in danger

Many times employers will believe they have the upper hand in the workplace over their subordinate employees, which could lead to abuse or wrongdoing. This is why there are employment laws designed to protect employee rights in the workplace in Wisconsin and other states. One of the most important laws is the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

Company agrees to comply with Family and Medical Leave Act

The law is designed to ensure that everybody is treated fairly in the workplace. This is especially important for employee rights, since employers are usually in a position of power in the relationship between employer and worker in Wisconsin or in any other state. One law which makes sure employee rights are being protected is the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). However, one employer was recently accused of violating this law by the federal authorities.

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