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Posts tagged "ADA"

New diagnostic guidelines may lead to ADA requests

As we often discuss in this blog, employers here in Wisconsin are required to make certain accommodations for employees with disabilities. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers must provide changes to a workplace or role--reasonable accommodations--in order to allow workers with disabilities to perform their jobs. Examples of such accommodations include modifying equipment, such as adding computer screen magnifiers or adjusting desk height, and adjusting schedules, among other things.

EEOC files genetic information discrimination lawsuit

We write quite a bit about the Americans with Disabilities Act in this Milwaukee Employment Law Blog. Many employers and employees in Wisconsin are aware that this federal law bars employers from discriminating against workers or job applicants on the basis of a real or perceived disability. Another law that is closely tied to the ADA is the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. This act was just passed into law in 2009, and many employers do not understand what this requires of them.

Number of unemployed people with disabilities rises

Some people here in Milwaukee may have heard the news last week that the number of unemployed people with disabilities has recently surged upward. The U.S. Department of Labor announced last week that 2 percent more disabled people sought unemployment benefits in January 2013 compared to January 2012.

Wisconsin student with disability pursues veterinary career

A frequent topic in this Wisconsin employment law blog is the Americans with Disabilities Act. This federal law makes it illegal for employers to discriminate against a person because of his or her disability. In fact, it even requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations when a physical or mental disability makes a work activity difficult or impossible.

Home Depot Settles Disability Discrimination Lawsuit for $100,000

home depot pic.jpgHome Depot, the world's largest home improvement retailer, recently settled a disability discrimination lawsuit, filed by the EEOC on behalf of a worker, for $100,000. Judy Henderson, who worked for the home improvement chain as a cashier for 13 years, requested permission to take an unpaid leave of absence to attend cancer treatments. The EEOC alleged that while Home Depot granted the leave, it later advised Ms. Henderson that if she did not advise the company of her status during the leave it would terminate her employment. Ms. Henderson provided medical notes confirming her return to work date. Nonetheless, Home Depot fired her claiming an alleged lack of work. However, the EEOC noted that in the past Home Depot used temporary lay offs when there was a lack of work and the company even hired two cashiers after Ms. Henderson submitted her medical documentation. According to an EEOC press release, the Home Depot's excuse for termination "was but a subterfuge for disability discrimination." EEOC regional attorney, Debra M. Lawrence stated, "it flies in the face of common sense and common decency to refuse to work with an employee who is battling cancer."

Duty to Accommodate

A newspaper recently agreed to pay a disabled employee $150,000 to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit.  A commercial print manager for the Jackson Sun took a medical leave of absence from work related to a spinal surgery and subsequent permanent spinal cord damage.  Following his return to work, and after only one week back on the job, the print manager was fired.  An EEOC press release alleges that Jackson Sun did not make a good-faith effort to accommodate the print manager's disability.

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