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Posts tagged "Employment Law"

Chris Kluwe's release spurs employment law questions

Wisconsin football fans know that the Minnesota Vikings released punter Chris Kluwe earlier this week although he had a year left on his contract. While the Vikings' management have claimed that Kluwe was cut so that the team could add a more competitive punter to its roster, a number of people--even the state's governor--have questioned whether the fact that Kluwe has become an outspoken gay rights advocate had anything to do with the decision.

Whistle-blower faces retaliation after filing safety complaint

One very important right of workers here in Wisconsin and throughout the U.S. is the right to voice workplace safety concerns without the fear of retaliation. Employees need to be able to express their concerns about workplace hazards and safety threats so that the employer, or authorities, can be aware of any issues that may endanger workers or patrons.

Equal Pay Day reminds Wisconsin workers of wage gap

Women and minorities recognized Equal Pay Day in Milwaukee on Tuesday by holding a demonstration at the Equal Rights Division, according to a local news report. The group used the occasion to call for the strengthening of existing anti-discrimination employment laws, and State Rep. Chris Sinicki and Wisconsin State Senator Chris Larson spoke at the event.

Only 18 percent of Americans with disabilities are employed

Although it has been illegal for employers to discriminate against workers and applicants with disabilities for more than 20 years in Wisconsin and throughout the U.S., a recent news report suggests that this type of discrimination is still very common. Only 18 percent of Americans with disabilities of working age are currently employed, and this is actually down 2 percent from 2009. According to the Associated Press, these numbers have been relatively stable since the Americans with Disabilities Act outlawed discrimination in employment in 1990.

In Wisconsin, do you need to have a job to get a job?

Many Wisconsin residents may have felt a bit relieved when last week's U.S. jobs report showed the unemployment rate dipping in February to its lowest point since December 2008. As the economy continues to mend, many people who have long been out of work may be able to finally find employment.

EEOC says firm discriminated against worker with breast cancer

A key aspect of the Americans with Disabilities Act is the fact that employers need to grant reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities. In order to eliminate artificial barriers to employment, employers must work with disabled employees to provide things that may be necessary such as a restructuring of duties, tools for the job, a job-protected leave, a modified work schedule or a reassignment, for example. When employers fail to abide by the law and provide accommodations, there may be consequences.

Legislation in Wisconsin might help close wage gap

Many employment disputes arise not because there are grey issues with employment law itself, but because it is difficult at times to enforce these laws. For example, discrimination in just about any shape or form is illegal in the workplace. This is a very clear cut issue, however, workers do not always know their rights when it comes to discrimination and even when they do it can be difficult to prove their cases and remedy them.

Milwaukee age discrimination suit settles for $32K

In April, 2010, a 62-year-old Wisconsin woman was fired from Computer Systems, LLC, in Milwaukee. The woman had worked loyally for the company for 38 years before she was suddenly replaced by a younger employee who she had just finished training. Last month, the now defunct computer company settled an age discrimination lawsuit filed by the former employee for $32,500.

Former IRS examiner arrested for naming whistle-blower

When an employee in Wisconsin decides to blow the whistle on his or her employer by exposing fraud, he or she can generally do this anonymously. Depending on which government whistleblower program the claim falls under, employees may be able to file the claim completely anonymously, or they may have to tell the government who they are, but not their their employers.

Justice Department installs whistle-blower ombudsman

Here in Wisconsin, and throughout the country, when an employee has knowledge that his or her employer is doing something illegal, the employee is in a very difficult position. The honorable and responsible thing to do is often to report the illegal activity by alerting authorities, but the whistle-blower might then risk being fired or retaliated against by the employer. Of course, it is illegal for the employer to respond in that way, but that does not always stop them.

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