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January 2015 Archives

Chronic pain and fatigue in the workplace

Chronic pain is becoming an increasingly common diagnosis for employees across the nation, and Wisconsin residents dealing with such issues can be affected in their ability to work. In some cases, chronic pain may even be connected to work-related activities. If you are attempting to continue in your job while enduring such pain, you may find that your performance is affected significantly. In some situations, disability accommodations or benefits may be needed.

Learning about disability benefits

Wisconsin employees may be interested in learning more about applying for disability benefits, as well as denials and cancellations. In order to receive an application and an estimate for compensation, people interested in obtaining disability benefits are advised to contact the Department of Employee Trust Funds by phone or in writing. Employees are required to file a series of forms and are prohibited from applying for these benefits before the last day on the job.

How to apply for disability benefits in Wisconsin

Workers in Wisconsin who are unable to perform their jobs due to an injury may be able to apply for disability benefits. These benefits may replace some or all of the income lost as a result of that inability. As many as 25 percent of all workers are expected to become disabled before age 67, according to the Social Security Administration.

Food workers offered whistle-blower protection

Wisconsin workers employed in the food industry may be interested in the protection they have under federal law if they should bring an issue of concern forward. Those who are engaged in the processing, packing, distribution or holding of food, among other activities, are protected from retaliation if they highlight a violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

Can break periods be deducted from wages?

Wisconsin employees may want to be aware of their rights as they begin a new job to ensure that there is no confusion with regard to break periods. An employer's handling of break periods may affect the manner in which one's paid time is computed, and the age of a worker makes a difference in how certain standards are applied as well.

Fired flight crew files complaint

In the summer of 2014, United Airlines, which has flights serving several Wisconsin cities, fired 13 flight attendants for refusing to fly on a trip from San Francisco to Hong Kong. The reason for the crew's refusal to fly was an ominous message and drawings that had been scrawled into the dirt on the plane that was to make the flight.

Former Baltimore detective files whistleblower lawsuit

A former Baltimore Police Department detective filed a whistle-blower lawsuit against the department, the former police commissioner and his supervisor on Dec. 22 in federal court in Baltimore. The detective, who reported an assault on a drug suspect by two fellow officers to the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office in 2012, alleges that his fellow officers began a pattern of harassment, threats and retaliation against him when he agreed to testify against the two officers at their subsequent trial.

Wage payment laws in Wisconsin

Wisconsin employers are mandated by law to pay workers at statutorily defined intervals for work an employee has performed. When a person quits or is discharged from a job, the employer is also mandated to pay for the remaining unpaid hours within a set period as well. Except for logging and farm labor employers, companies must pay workers a minimum of once monthly. The pay to workers must cover all hours worked not more than 31 days in the past. Logging and farm labor employers must pay workers at a minimum of once quarterly.

Alan C. Olson & Associates | 2880 S Moorland Rd | New Berlin, WI 53151
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