${site.data.firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt}
Call Today 262-373-9786

November 2015 Archives

Emojis can be evidence in workplace discrimination complaints

A great number of Wisconsin employers engage in electronic communication with their employees. Emails and text messages are convenient and can provide documentation of past communications if it needed in the future. Oftentimes, people use emojis in their digital messages to save time, get laughs or communicate their thoughts more accurately. Although these tiny pictures are fun to use, they can cause big legal problems if an employee files a complaint.

Emojis can be evidence in workplace discrimination complaints

A great number of Wisconsin employers engage in electronic communication with their employees. Emails and text messages are convenient and can provide documentation of past communications if it needed in the future. Oftentimes, people use emojis in their digital messages to save time, get laughs or communicate their thoughts more accurately. Although these tiny pictures are fun to use, they can cause big legal problems if an employee files a complaint.

Child Labor Provisions of the FLSA

The Fair Labor Standards Act was established in 1938 and outlines federal laws that are ultimately used to protect employees in Wisconsin and throughout the United States. This legislation establishes a minimum wage for all workers, as well as overtime pay, and also sets standards for keeping records and youth employment. Employment as a minor is very important to many young individuals in the country and their protection is a priority.

Wisconsin whistleblowers await federal judge's decision

Wisconsin whistleblowers who called attention to alleged Medicare fraud may be among those in multiple states who may soon be affected by how or whether US Department of Justice prosecutors can come up with additional evidence to comply with a federal district court judge's order. The judge has stated that she may throw out the whistleblower lawsuit unless the Justice Department can come up with more than expert opinion testimony. 

Does Wisconsin law differ from federal Family Medical Leave Act?

Workers in Wisconsin should be aware they are protected by both state and federal laws pertaining to medical leave. There are, however, differences between the two statutes when it comes to eligibility and the amount of leave that may be taken.

Employee rights and wrongful termination

Knowing your employee rights in the state of Wisconsin is an important part of having a successful career. Too many are unaware of federal laws that protect them against harassment, retaliation and uphold their fair labor standards while they are in the workplace. Certain guidelines must be met for all employees, but some are given even further or specialized protection—such as those with disabilities.

What are some forms of whistleblower protection in Wisconsin?

Although Wisconsin provides multiple ways for employees to respond if they believe that they are being discriminated against or retaliated against by their employers in connection with whistleblower activity, there is no single overarching whistleblower statute in this state to cover all circumstances. Instead, Wisconsin law with regard to whistleblower protections is more like a patchwork quilt of multiple statutes that cover specific situations, coupled with certain common-law protections as well as protections under federal law.

Manage stress while engaged in long-term disabilities dispute

Being involved in a long-term disabilities dispute in Wisconsin can be extremely stressful. This type of dispute unfolds when an employee, such as yourself, is denied benefits that are rightfully deserved after an accidents or serious medical condition has put that employee out of work. Not only could you be out of your job, but the continuous denial of benefits could mean that your income is limited to non-existent. You might also lose your health benefits until your claim is recognized.

Alan C. Olson & Associates | 2880 S Moorland Rd | New Berlin, WI 53151
Phone: 262-373-9786 | Toll Free: 1-888-742-9520 | Map & Directions